Why Fighting Corruption
The negative impact of corruption?
According to the World Bank, about US$1 trillion is paid each year in bribes around the world, and the total economic loss from corruption is estimated to be many times that number. This figure dwarfs the value of all development assistance. The World Bank Group considers corruption a major challenge to its institutional goals of ending extreme poverty by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity for the poorest 40 percent in developing countries. 

According to studies carried out by international anti-corruption organisations, corruption impacts societies in a multitude of ways. In the worst cases, it costs lives. Short of this, it costs people their opportunity to develop. The cost of corruption can be divided into four main categories: political, economic, social and environmental.

On the political front, corruption is a major obstacle to democracy and the rule of law. In a democratic system, offices and institutions lose their legitimacy when they’re misused for private advantage. This is harmful in established democracies, but even more so in newly emerging ones. It is extremely challenging to develop accountable political leadership in a corrupt climate.

Economically, corruption depletes national wealth. Corrupt politicians invest scarce public resources in projects that will line their pockets rather than benefit communities, and prioritise high-profile projects such as dams, power plants, pipelines and refineries over less spectacular but more urgent infrastructure projects such as schools, hospitals and roads. Corruption also hinders the development of fair market structures and distorts competition, which in turn deters investment.
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